The Nicotine Free E Cigarette Revolution

Studies suggesting that the devices help people quit are too few and too small on which to base any firm, science-based recommendations or advice, says Thomas Glynn, Ph.D., director of International Cancer Control at the American Cancer Society.

And in many parts of the U.S., e-cigarettes can be used in traditionally nonsmoking areas, such as bars, restaurants, and offices. That’s a problem when you consider that smoking has declined among Americans in recent years largely due to campaigns that prohibit people from lighting up in public places.

And while electronic cigarettes are often marketed as a healthier alternative, there’s no guarantee that all of the devices are safe. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has not yet issued final regulations on e-cigarettes, so “consumers cannot always be sure of what they are inhaling,” says Glynn.

Many are made in China, where manufacturing oversight isn’t as tight; additionally, studies have found contaminants and impurities in a few brands, albeit at low levels. Until e-cigarettes are regulated, says Nathan Cobb, M.D., a pulmonologist at Georgetown University Medical Center, it’s best to use FDA-approved nicotine-delivery devices, such as –

  • Patches
  • Gum

Some e-cigarette companies claim the devices are safer and can help smokers quit. But critics say the companies’ statements are unproven and their health claims are unsubstantiated.It is true that e-cigarettes do not contain the over 4,000 chemical compounds created by a burning cigarette. Many of these are toxic and/or carcinogenic. All that you find in all in regular cigarette smoke –

  • Tar
  • Carbon monoxide
  • Nitrogen oxides
  • Hydrogen cyanide
  • Ammonia

However, nicotine itself is dangerous and highly addictive, and with e-cigarettes, smokers may not know how much of it they’re getting. A lack of regulation and quality control means the amount of nicotine in each drag of an e-cigarette is inconsistent. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration determined that since e-cigarettes are not considered a drug.

Even if, as some enthusiasts claim, e-cigarettes can help a smoker quit, could it also entice young people to start? Health experts and the administration have both expressed concern e-cigarettes are marketed toward young people since the devices come in pink, gold or blue with flavors such as chocolate and bubble gum. Plus, the products’ labels don’t have a health warning.

Now, theses are the reference links –

  1. Quitting Smoking by COPD
  2. E Cigarettes by Squidoo
  3. E Cigarettes – Good Idea by Addiction

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